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This Week's News 04.08.17

Hang on to those apprentices!

Apprenticeships are a wonderful investment in the future of your business: the journey your apprentices take will be one of the most difficult and important of their lives. If you make it a success, you'll most likely have created a passionate, loyal employee with unrivalled knowledge of your business. It's also a two-way street: employers are always surprised by the amount they learn from the young people on their teams.

The quest to keep apprentices engaged begins the moment they join your salon.  New apprentices should be properly inducted and have a clear on-boarding and training process. Nobody likes to feel out of their depth, so do all you can to help them hit the ground running. This also extends beyond readying them professionally; small touches such as a welcome lunch and their name already on the work roster can work wonders in helping new team members to form essential bonds with their peers. If you invest in apprentices, you'll want to do everything possible to hang onto the young people you've painstakingly recruited and inducted. So, why do apprentices quit their programmes, and what can you, as their employer, do to hang onto them?

The right support at the right time

Some apprentices will struggle with their studies, while others might feel under-challenged and bored. You can help here by keeping your ITS Trainer/Assessor in the loop and fostering a really strong relationship. You need to know who's strong, who's struggling and who's coasting. You or a line manager or mentor can then make time to discuss any issues. Even a five-minute chat with a young person shows them that you're focused on them and care about their educational progress.

Everyone needs to know why they're at work

Apprentices need a really clear understanding of their role in your business and what's expected of them. They need good guidance about balancing their time to allow enough time for study and who to speak to when they're struggling.

It's a whole new world: give them a map

Apprentices fresh from school and college will need help with the transition. They're likely to need training in soft skills like teamwork, time management and communication, and also in core business skills like dealing with clients. Young people need to know how to behave in a completely new environment, and they need to know what you expect of them.

They'll need lots of love

Make sure your apprentices have plenty of support: it isn't easy being young and new to the world of work, and there will inevitably days when they hate the whole setup. You need these to be the days when they chat with their mentor about what's going wrong, rather than the day they fire off a hasty email handing in their resignation. Put mentors in place in addition to managers and supervisors. Remember, also, that when you're working with young adults, there is always a lot of variety in terms of maturity. Some apprentices will do well with high expectations and will take off fast while others will need seemingly endless hand-holding. This doesn't mean you should give up: recognise that the learning curve for some is just much steeper. This doesn't mean the potential you saw at interview won't be realised, just that you'll probably need more thought, planning and support to get there.


Calling all in-salon assessors! Are you thinking of becoming an end-point assessor for apprenticeships?

A large-scale event is being hosted to help kick-start your preparations in understanding what makes a good end-point assessor. The event will feature plenary and workshops sessions to develop your skills and build your knowledge of end-point assessment methods and practices. Before the event you'll have access to an online self-assessment to identify your CPD needs and help you choose workshop sessions to attend. At the event, you will have chance to meet Apprentice Assessment Organisations (AAOs) and understand their requirements. The workshop is being held in London on Tuesday 30th January 2018. Find out more and book here - any questions can be directed to Zoe Bolger at ku/oc/krowtentnempolevedcigetarts//eoz


Fascinating report about the hair and beauty industry

At last – an insight into the current and future skills and workforce challenges across the industry. Over 700 industry individuals contributed to the research, including employers, employees, training providers, suppliers, awarding organisations, trade associations, consumers, and government statutory authorities.

Key findings include:

  • Roles are becoming much more technical, requiring greater knowledge and skill, and salons are offering more holistic services which provide a whole new customer experience. Micro-needling and chemical peels are two examples of qualifications that reach degree level standard.
  • There is demand for greater regulation to raise the standards of the industry, both via Government enforced methods such as the Skills Plan and the Apprenticeship Levy, but also through industry-led initiatives such as a mandatory register for hairdressers and barbers.
  • Career routes into and through the sector are not confined to traditional job roles. New and interesting routes have been opened which include pathways into careers such as aesthetic nursing, non-surgical beauty technician, trichologist and a variety of roles supporting rehabilitation and palliative care, as well as dedicated film industry roles such as cosmetologists, and semi-permanent makeup artists.

The report can be found here


Is mandatory registration a step closer?

The Hair Council's report on the Case for Mandatory Registration for Hairdressing and Barbering is being championed by John McNally MP who is a barber by trade and represents Falkirk.

The key findings of the report are:

  • Roles are becoming much more technical, requiring greater knowledge and skill, and salons are offering more holistic services which provide a whole new customer experience. Micro-needling and chemical peels are two examples of qualifications that reach degree level standard.
  • There is demand for greater regulation to raise the standards of the industry, both via Government enforced methods such as the Skills Plan and the Apprenticeship Levy, but also through industry-led initiatives such as a mandatory register for hairdressers and barbers.
  • Career routes into and through the industry are not confined to traditional job roles. New and interesting routes have been opened which include pathways into careers such as aesthetic nursing, non-surgical beauty technician, trichology and a variety of roles supporting rehabilitation and palliative care, as well as dedicated film industry roles such as cosmetologists, and semi-permanent makeup artists.

Chief Executive and Registrar of The Hair and Barber Council Keith Conniford said: "The results clearly state that the voice of industry, and that of the consumer, is hugely concerned that the hair and barber industry has no form of professional status or recognition. Mandatory Registration is clearly identified by both sectors as the way forward, whilst giving the consumer confidence in the people carrying out their hair services.” The report can be found here.


Social media safety guides

Find out more about the safety features available on the popular social networks - click here


Congratulations to Hooker and Young on ambassador role

Multi-award-winning duo, Gary Hooker and Michael Young have been announced as the first joint ambassadors for the NHF (National Hairdressers Federation). The ten-time British Hairdresser of the Year nominees have gone from strength-to-strength in the 25 years since starting their phenomenal salon business that's led them to win numerous awards for both creative and business excellence. Their role as joint ambassadors began on 1st July 2017 and will also be supplying information for NHF members on how to succeed in different areas of business.


Employment tribunal fees unlawful, rules Supreme Court

Employment tribunal fees are unlawful under both UK and EU law because they prevent access to justice, the Supreme Court has ruled. Since July 2013, workers in the UK have been charged a fee to bring a claim to tribunal, a further fee if the claim is heard and another charge if they want to appeal the decision. The seven Supreme Court judges accepted that the effect of employment tribunal fees has been a dramatic and persistent fall in the number of claims, in particular claims of lower value and claims without a financial remedy. According to the Supreme Court, employment tribunal fees are not reasonably affordable for households on low to middle incomes. Even where they may have been affordable, they have prevented access to justice by making it financially ill advised to pursue a claim unless claimants were certain of wining and recovering their fees. The Supreme Court decided that tribunal fees are also unlawful under the EU legal guarantee of an effective remedy because they impose a disproportionate limit on the ability to enforce EU employment rights.


UK businesses have 'contagious' leadership

Some of the best, but also the worst, leadership behaviours spread contagiously through a business because people are most heavily influenced by the colleagues they work with most. Research has revealed that workplace behaviours are highly "infectious” with 74% of professionals having actively emulated attributes seen in their colleagues. The most contagious traits are also the most critical to get right, including communication, copied by one-fifth (18%), problem-solving (9%) and customer service (10%). Workers imitate colleagues for different reasons depending on the behavioural characteristics. For example, three quarters (74%) of people who copy the humour of their colleagues think it will help them work better with colleagues. Nearly one-third (29%) who emulate delegation and organisation skills do so to gain promotion or a pay rise. People are not influenced by traditional hierarchies when it comes to who they emulate. Almost half (49%) of respondents revealed they replicate behaviours from people across their organisation regardless of their age, and a similar number (46%) say they copy behaviours from people of all levels of seniority.


Congratulations to the following learner who completed her Apprenticeship this week

Olivia Collins – Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship - Leo Bancroft, Weybridge

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